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HISTORICAL PLACES
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Artemision
Belevi Mausoleum
Caravanserail
Cave of Zeus
Cappadocia
Claros
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Ephesus
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Hierapolis
Iasos
Isa Bey
Kursunlu
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Kusadasi Guide
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hierapolis

hierapolis


   Hierapolis was established by King Eumenes 2 and was given the name of "Hiera" in the honour of the wife of Telephos, the legendary establisher of the ancient Pergamum.

   Hierapolis was visited frequently by the people from the nearest cities and Laodicea -the ancient site established before Hierapolis, for using the thermal springs known for its curing properties to various illnesses. From the 3 BC, as the fame of Hierapolis increased continually, migrations started from around and Hierapolis became an attractive and a favorable settlement, a rival city to Laodicea.

   Hierapolis was given to the Roman Empire in 133 BC, in the will of Pergamon King, Attalos 2. The city was destroyed completely by an earthquake in 17AD, in the reign of Tiberious. The re-construction of Hierapolis was started in 60 AD, during the reign of Nero. Hierapolis reached its high and lived the most prosperous periods during the reign of Severus and his son Caracalla, around the years of 196AD and 215AD. A considerable development existed in the city, in art and culture. Many rich marble mines were founded and the marbles of Hierapolis were used in Hagia Sophia of Istanbul.

   Hierapolis was governed by a Roman governor of Ephesus, in the Roman period. Sources stated that the city was also visited by Hadrian. With the division of the Roman Empire into two in 395 AD, the city was ruled by the Byzantine. Hierapolis became the capital of Phyrigia during the reign of Constantine.

   The acceptance of Christianity created a new stage for the social and religious structure of Hierapolis’ becoming a patriarchal center. Also, in 80 AD, St. Philip -one of the 12 Apostles, was thought to have been killed in Hierapolis. The city lost its prior importance from the early of the 6th century, continuing to the 11th century. The dreadful earthquake in 1354 meant the city was emptied, totally and has not settled properly since that date, even in Turkish-Ottoman periods. The city was covered by the uncontrolled waters and travertine. Today the thermal waters of Hierapolis reached to its former fame and became an interesting touristical center for foreigners.

Hierapolis was not reputed only for its thermal waters, but also for its various temples and social activities including the lively festivals and music concerts, favored by all. Therefore, tourism was one of the main incomes of Hierapolis, during that era. Textile was also developed gradually and became the principal source of the city’s prosperity.

How to Go?… Generally, all agencies of Kusadasi provide reasonable packet tours to Pamukkale by buses with the professional guides. Also from the bus station of Kusadasi, there is a variety of buses going to "Denizli", that is about 18 km away from Hierapolis. After reaching to Denizli, you may easily find minibuses to Hierapolis.   

Kusadasi Guide