Historical Places

Go

Ephesus 1Ephesus 2Ephesus 3

HISTORICAL PLACES
Index
Aphrodisias
Artemision
Belevi Mausoleum
Caravanserail
Cave of Zeus
Cappadocia
Claros
Didyma
Ephesus
Euromos
Heraclea
Hierapolis
Iasos
Isa Bey
Kursunlu
Labranda
Magnesia
Miletos
Neopolis
Notion
Panionion
Pergamum
Phygale
Priene
Saint John
Sardis
Selcuk Castle
Seven Churches
Seven Sleepers
Teos
Virgin Mary

EXTRAS
Ephesus Tours

HOT PAGES
Online Shopping

Virtual Postcards
Guest Book
Hot Life
Diving
Aqua Park
Avis Rent a Car

TURKISH MUSIC
Listen Live

ASK MUGU
Questions & Answers
Ask Question

CONTACT US
Information
Advertisement
Help

Kusadasi Guide
ęCopyright by OTTI
1998-2012

All Rights Reserved

ephesus turkey

ephesus


   In the year of 10 BC, Androclos, the son of King of Athens-Kodros, was searching a location for establishing a site. Androclos belonged to Akhas , was running from the Dor invasion in Greece. He was leading one of the migration convoys. It was predicted by an Apollon oracle that a fish and a boar would show the location of the new settlement. Days later, parallel to the oracle’s prediction, while frying, a fish fell down from the pan, irritating a hiding boar behind the bushes. The feared boar escaped immediately. Androclos followed the boar and established the city of Ephesus, where he had killed the boar. When Androclos died in the wars with Carians, a mausoleum was built to the memory of the first king of Ephesus. The mausoleum is considered to be placed around "The Door of Magnesia".

   Ephesus was ruled by the Lydian king, Kreisos, in the mid 6BC. The city reached the "Golden Age" and became a good model to the Antic World in culture and art, as well. But the inhabitants of Ephesus moved away. Because they did not like being ruled and lived in the new Ephesus that is located around the area of Artemision. As the detailed excavations have not completed yet, apart from the Artemision, the remains of that age haven’t been revealed.

   Later, Ephesus was dominated by Persians. As Ephesians did not join the "Ionian Rebellion" against Persians, the city was saved from destruction. The rebellion resulted in the loss of Persian. Alexander the Great won Persians and the Ionian cities got their independence in the year of 334. Ephesus was in great prosperity during the times of Alexander the Great Until the arrival of Alexander the Great, Ephesus was consisted of two governing systems, democratic and oligarchic. But the oligarchic system was violated with the coming of a new ruler, and a rebellion existed in Ephesus. The Temple of Artemision was fired and destroyed by the supporters of oligarchy in 356BC. As the temple became unusable, Alexander the Great proposed for repairing. But the Ephesians delicately refused for the reason that "A God can not built a temple for a God." An Ephesian architect, Dinocrates restored the Temple of Artemision.

   After the death of Alexander the Great, Ephesus was ruled by the general of him, Lysimakhos, in 287 BC. Lysimakhos decided to change the prior location of Ephesus to further west, due to the destruction of the port by the alluviums, and the inhabitants were forced to settle in the new place named "Arsinoeina", the name of Lysimakhos’ wife. The city was surrounded by wide stone walls in 10 meters height and 9 meters length. With the death of Lysimakhos, Ephesians destroyed most of the city walls. And, "Arsinoeina" was changed into "Ephesus" again, to be forgotten eternally.

next-->
Read more about Ephesus
Kusadasi Guide